Background

I randomly signed up for an online physics course that would last six weeks. Little did I know, I would become so intrigued by the end that I am now spending every spare second reading science blogs, science books, and re-watching the lectures of the course. I plan to share with whomever takes the time to read this, the exciting new things that I learned from the course.

Let me start with an introduction about the course.

The title of the course was “Gravity! From the big bang to black holes.” So, as you may assume, the topics ranged from Einstein’s general relativity, the big bang, inflation, dark matter, dark energy, gravitational waves, and black holes. Some old concepts, some new (to me). The best thing about the course was that you did not need to have any background in physics. Just an appetite for learning, and maybe some extra research on your own time if interested.

The course was taught by Professor Pierre Binetruy of Paris Diderot University. Pierre was the first director of the AstroParticle and Cosmology laboratory in Paris upon it’s creation. His main interests, according to a bio online, include cosmology and gravitation; connecting the theories of the early universe and fundamental interactions. He’s highly knowledgeable about inflation models, dark energy, and cosmological background of gravitational waves. Due to these areas of interest, he is highly involved in the eLisa mission- which I will go into more detail about later on.

I would just like to express how happy I am about taking this class. The course provided such lucid, comprehensible explanations on theories and concepts of physics. There was hardly any math involved, which was nice. The detailed explanations and demonstration’s made these unfamiliar concepts easy to grasp. Finally, Pierre arranged live hangouts where we were introduced to prestigious scientists, and we were able to ask questions during a live chat. George Smoot was one scientist that was present during the hangouts, and also recorded a lecture himself to explain the concept that won him the Nobel Prize in 2006. We were also able to meet key scientists that were actively involved in the LISAPathfinder mission, which was launched 12/03/2015. This mission will (hopefully) uncover another corner of the veil on the universe. I now anxiously await the discoveries that will be made from this mission. The series of blog posts that follow should explain why.

Here I will post the links to the series of posts I will be writing:

  1. The Implications of Gravity in Spacetime
  2. Waves of Spacetime- GW150914
  3. Black Holes: Part I
Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Background

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s